Tag Archives: vintage overcoat

Classic vintage menswear, the Overcoat, Aquascutum.

 

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The name Aquascutum is synonymous with quality tailoring, with elegance and tradition.
The company was set up by John Emary in 1851, the same year as the Great Exhibition at Crystal Palace, and started as a tailors shop in London’s Mayfair. Emary took out a patent on the first water resistant fabric, and the name Aquascutum, it’s brand name, is Latin for water shield.
Aquascutum moved premises in 1895, to Regent Street, and in 1897 received its first Royal Warrant, from the Prince of Wales. Thereafter, Aquascutum enjoyed the long and prestigious patronage of the British Royal Family, receiving six Royal Warrants in total, the last in 1952 from Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother.
During the Crimean war and in both World Wars, Aquascutum Made military trench coats, and was respected for both its military as well as its civil tailoring. Throughout its long history, Aquascutum dressed royalty, the military, stars of stage and screen, politicians, Everest climbers and even the 1996 British Olympic team.
Producing high quality men’s and women’s tailored coats, suits and uniforms, Aquascutum has a long history of innovation, fabric innovation and brand development that has earned it a particular place in British fashion and social history. Aquascutum was sold to YGM Holdings, a Chinese Company in 2012 after floundering in the early part of the 21st century.
During the 1940s 50s and 60s, a well dressed man would complete his outfit with a good quality woollen overcoat. This would be a capacious garment, cut to fit over the jacket of a suit. It was generally a well tailored garment and ideally would be made to measure, although “off the peg” became more commonplace, with gents outfitters able to make alterations where needed to a ready made garment. Overcoats from the first half of the twentieth century often have weatherproof finishes, satin or silk linings, and generous pockets. They may be double breasted, echoing the style of the war time trench coat, or single breasted, which generally sits better over a suit. They may have set in sleeves or raglan sleeves. Fabrics would usually be thick and dense wool weaves, in tweeds, checks or plaids, with colours and styles suitable for both town and country.
Buying a vintage overcoat is a great investment, as a quality new overcoat bought from a tailor today will set you back the upwards side of £600, whilst a good vintage coat may be picked up for under £200. Check the label, as it will give you information about the maker and the fabric composition. Some labels will instantly indicate a high quality garment, e.g Aquascutum, Gieves & Hawkes, Jaeger, Mackintosh, Austin Reed. Other labels may offer a local connection, e.g.made for a particular gentleman’s outfitter in a certain town.
Make a note of your own measurements, and compare them with the vintage item. The overcoat is designed to wear over a jacket, so it will be quite roomy. You may need to add a few inches to your own chest measurement for ease. Check both the sleeve length and the width across the shoulders. Nape of neck to hem will give you the length, which may be well below the knee, just below the knee, or a ¾ “car coat” length, which can be worn quite casually. The width from armpit to armpit , when doubled, gives you the chest measurement plus an allowance for ease of wear over your other clothes. Look at the overall condition of the coat. In particular, look for signs of wear at the cuffs, and pocket tops, which can become thin, check inside pocket linings for any tears or rips, and the lining, particularly under the arms and along the back seam, as this is where you will seem most signs of wear and tear. Any small defects can be repaired, such as missing stitching on a lining seam, or an odd missing button. If you are buying on-line, don’t be reluctant to ask for extra measurements or details from the seller. If you are a careful buyer, you will be able to add a high quality coat to your wardrobe, and will be able to wear it proudly for many years to come.

Please note the Aquascutum illustration and 1950s advert are not my own ©️

https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/coolclobber

 

Vintage key pieces.

Coolclobber , vintage coats
New stock at Coolclobber, women’s coats, men’s coats.
Vintage accessories for men and women
New selected accessories from Coolclobber

I have been busy adding new stock to the collection, with over a hundred mens accessories now in stock, and women’s accessories up in the eighties, browse away! The complete store inventory is now over five hundred items of vintage clothing and accessories, sorted in to convenient sections.

Two great recent finds…..a 1960s London Maid car coat, made from fabulous Llama wool, with oversized crochet buttons…it’s classic, and a great key piece for any 60s wardrobe. The gentleman’s tailored overcoat was a particularly great find, as it was originally sold at a local gentleman’s outfitters here in West Wales, Daniel Davies, Men’s and Boys outfitters of Lampeter. It is in amazing condition with a glossy satin lining and a sealskin finish.

It is certainly the season for wearing a scarf. I have some fabulous silky headsquares in stock. Wear them like Audrey or Grace, or add an accent to a suit or coat by wearing them Western style, folded diagonally and knotted at the back of the neck.  Always popular for men, the gentleman’s reversible silky and wool scarf, adopted in the 1960s by scooter riding Mods….so great with a traditional overcoat  and equally good with your old fish tailed parka!

https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/coolclobber

What’s your favourite vintage accessory?